Thursday, April 27, 2017

The bogging down effect of social conservatism

I've been reading a lot lately from various conservative writers what they consider bad social trends. It could be millenials delaying marriage and then further delaying having children. Some couples don't want children at all. Another conservative opiner will note the to him disturbing trend that Americans don't move as much as they used to (as if it's easy), go to other better jobs across the country. This leads to ossification and lower wages etc. etc. The list of social concerns for these writers/pundits run the gamut and is quite long but I always find myself asking what does it matter? Why are they bothered by these things? Modern conservatism should stick to the pillars of limited government, free speech, economic growth, a strong defense, lower taxes etc. etc. What matter how people choose to live their lives? Is that really of our concern? Naomi Schaeffer Riley and Kyle Smith are two of these social-type commenters. Another common complaint is people especially the young'uns are on their gadgets too much. My friend and I were walking around White Plains one day and practically everyone was walking but looking down at their smartphones. Yeah you wonder what the hell are they looking at to the point where they can fall down an open manhole but again this is what people do. IMO conservatism has strayed heavily off the straight path into these by-roads of cultural concern which can actually lead to other conservatives feeling alienated if they don't share their complaints. Laura Ingraham too has done this in books and whatnot heavy on the social commentary, trends that bug her, social quirks and patterns that don't meet her approval. I think this is where the word "reactionary" comes from as in reacting to everything. The conservative movement seems to be stagnating at the moment with everyone having their disparate concerns with no common thread except things like hatred of Obama, hatred of Hillary, hatred of whoever. Despite all this I think we won the last election by accident. You won, what are we complaining about?

193 comments:

  1. Agreed. The conservative tent contains everyone who dislike
    liberal/progressive ideals. But some of them dislike their own just as much. I saw a guy on the Telly a couple days back, said he voted for Trump because at one point Trump said he was in favor of he European single payer healthcare
    system. Put him in the tent temporarily. I tend to agree about the electronic social media: we eat out frequently and see young couples sitting in booths, both much involved
    with their little smartphone things, never looking or speaking at each other. Ironic, is it not, that the conservative social complainers have a TwitterPresident?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Some of the stuff they complain about ain't that important. To me the sign of a good writer is five years from now you go why did I write that?

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  3. Also millenials are easy to pick on. They never fought in a war and they're on tumblr tinder or 4chan all the time. The greatest generation not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a member of the 'Silent Generation', I can't comment or criticize the Millenials. But, I'm glad my Karma landed me in the 'Lucky Few': missed WWII/Korea,
      lived during the Eisenhower years when the middle class was a force to be recognized and went to college
      @ $275 a semester. Still....I had to get out the book on the remote sensing outdoor thermometer today
      just to change the batteries. We Silents are electronically challenged. Where can I get a radio
      with a dial, a phone with dial and Dial Soap anymore?

      Delete
  4. You know what's interesting CERN gave us the internet or the world-wide web. First webpage was in 1989 between researchers and public access to the web in '93. Tim Berners-Lee. I repeat it was not Al Gore.

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  5. My work with computers in complex explosives chemistry was done by the time the internet was born. Requisite data and equations were transmitted via snail mail and land line.
    Worked OK and there was no spam.

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  6. Interesting, in this data infected age of trivia, even the
    most popular things have a short short lived
    fame. Heck, I used the same baseball glove for 6 years.
    Just observing.

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  7. I had thought going around looking at your smartphone all day would kinda fade out. I thought bigger screens on smartphones would fade out (harder to put in your ass pocket). Sushi definitely not a fad.

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  8. Food fads- we had a few Sushi Bars show up in town, but apparently cowboys and loggers don't eat cold fish. A few
    of the college people keep it going. Cronuts still haven't
    invaded the high country, but the local phenom of 'bite sized stead' continues to be the big deal; even tourists
    come looking for that item. Steak cut into shish kabob or fondue size, sometimes then deep fried, sometimes not, often with a dip au jus. 'Bites & bites' has portabella
    mushrooms cut to the same size, the affair then fried. Been
    a staple in a hundred mile square area for years. Never expanded to the bigger towns...must be cowboy-logger stuff.

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  9. I actually find Dailymotion a more useful video site than YouTube. Yesterday I watched a full Twilight Zone and Night Gallery episode whereas on YT you often get snippets and portions of tv episodes and movies. However how many people at work talk about Dailymotion?

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  10. Browsed tinnitus again on my phone last night. You figure latest news and updates but it's still no cure or medicine just basically coping and managing strategies. We can make quantum computers, send men to the moon......

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    Replies
    1. You would think with the high numbers of people with
      tinnitus, it would be a lucrative area for Med/Pharma.
      Saw a TV ad for some pill this morning that had the
      usual, but odd, disclaimer "Do not take if you are
      allergic to any of the ingredients". Most pills have
      at least a dozen ingredients, but you have to do a lot
      of research to find them. Meanwhile you could be in
      the throes of anaphylactic shock. When I was a kid,
      my sister and I were subjected to an annual spring
      dose of castor oil. Like we had been constipated all winter. Thought for years it was used to oil the casters on furniture. Found it came from the caster bean. So does Ricin. How did we survive childhood?

      Delete
    2. We're in a kind of medical status quo right now and that's because imo doctors are thinking too much inside the box. People don't understand how debilitating the condition can be. You mention it at work and a woman will say she sometimes gets a noise inside her head but that ain't the same thing. If you're able to put in a full day's work people think it's ok. Insomnia seems to be another thing doctors ain't good at. You have chronic sufferers for years and short of prescribing pills medicine comes up short once again.

      Delete
    3. Could be tinnitus/insomnia and related problems are
      a sign of the times: everything is a rush job, bosses are carriers of stress, traffic cams peek at you, the noise of civilization is just one of the many types of pollution we make. Maybe back in
      pre-history, the cave people had no tinnitus or insomnia; the wild is fairly quiet that way. Or..
      the stresses of those times (your bro got eaten
      by a sabre tooth tiger, you are down to your last
      flint arrowhead, the mammoths have moved north for
      the season and your fire went out during the last
      snowstorm. Tinnitus/insomnia were minor for them?

      Delete
    4. Kind of like fibromyalgia a general condition. I get the feeling if you had chosen medicine as a career you would have solved it by now (the intellectual curiosity, the drive). If a tinnitus researcher thought outside of the box he or she might conclude maybe a small subset of sufferers hear an actual sound (e.g. the worldwide hum). Surprised to read recently that anxiety is the #1 claim for workplace disabilities.

      Delete
    5. Actually, there may be a relation between fibromyalgia and tinnitus, both being among a list
      of neurological conditions that appear to be caused
      by exitoxicity related to glutamate biochemistry.
      Some initial British research is based on
      neurodegeneration of the miniature hair cells of the inner ear, caused by 'glutamate flood'. The physiology is pretty straightforward and the cure
      involves suppression of glutamate receptors at the site; the nerve/hair cells can regenerate. As always, we note the disparity in the population and
      throw in 'congenital disposition'. I was pondering
      the velocity of sound in air, and looking for what
      effects a flush of other gas types might do for tinnitus. (Found nothing there, but became interested in the neurobiology of the tiny hairs of the inner ear). No, K-Y jelly won't help.

      Delete
    6. So much knowledge that doesn't translate into a treatable treatment. Don't they have Rogaine for the inner ear?

      Delete
    7. Rogaine comes to mind. I'm not sure it grows hair,
      but it is a vasodilator. You would think that if they can transplant major organs, they could replace
      little ear parts. You ever have ear infections when
      you were under 5 years old? That is the latest subject regarding hearing loss in old age. Which my
      wife has and she had awful ear aches as a child.
      She says. So that is another possible tinnitus culprit muddying the waters.

      Delete
    8. As imperfect as it is cancer has its chemo/radiation regimen. Where is the tinnitus regimen?

      Delete
  11. If you want a good laugh and like horror watch the Tales From the Darkside episode "A Case of the Stubborns." Watched it on Dailymotion before. Priceless.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Checked out Dailymotion. Haven't figured it out. Big outfit
    from France.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me neither. All I know is I can find full tv episodes that YouTube chops up and mangles. Vevo and Vimeo are two others.

      Delete
  13. Caught a bit of Judge Judy today. Found her in contempt and
    turned her off. What's the draw, the big popularity of that
    show? Did those viewers vote for Trump? I see he was a hit
    at the NRA convention. How come those pistol packing macho
    types worship a five time draft dodger? Do they watch J.
    Judy?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What is the draw to her scowling ways? It's like milk gone sour.

      Delete
  14. I'm wondering if Ronald Reagan would have gone to war against N. Korea. Don't know if the bookies are on this but the odds seem fairly strong. Even a hawk has to have some wisdom.

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  15. Different times, hard to make comparisons. IMO, Bay of Pigs
    and the brink of nuclear winter were still on people's minds, N Korea was primitive and marginal. Reagan was more
    cautious than his pronouncements; when an entire battalion of Marines were blown up in Lebanon, he sent a battleship
    to shell the shoreline and pulled out the rest of the US
    troops. He ignored significant provocation in
    Lebanese affairs. His only 'preemptive' invasion was on the
    little island of Grenada, where 400 Cuban airport workers
    were overwhelmed by a yuuuuge US military force. The comparison, though is valid in that each of these presidents
    were show biz people, the 'art of marketing' experts that played to very loyal bases which continue to be an unusual
    mix of credulous working class and ever more greedy upper class, using the former and rewarding the latter. Reagan
    started what, IMO, is a wealth distribution problem, and Trump appears to drive that economics to a mysterious and
    concerning conclusion. IMO.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We're not talking Lebanon or Cameroon. N. KOREA

      Delete
    2. The strategy is what exactly? Invade N. Korea, nuke Pyongyang or kill Jong-Un by Amazon drone?

      Delete
    3. Trump should simply buy it.

      Delete
    4. ..and once US property, put Judge Judy in charge.

      Delete
    5. Do you know how much money this woman makes for a half hour judge show in which she abuses people?

      Delete
    6. Considerably more than a top neurosurgeon who repairs victims of her vitriol on her so-called
      show. Lock Her Up

      Delete
    7. The reality shows are turning me off TV. Last night
      I found an old Barney Miller on some channel. What
      happened to creativity? Who or what is the viewing
      audience anymore? Trump & hostile media is sort of an interesting series. FoxNews fired their president. Trump said if he was president back in the day, there would have been no Civil War (Holy
      Shades of Old Abe!). I'll give him the benefit of the doubt on that one "Nuke Richmond, nuke New Orleans, send the fleet, level Savanna...lock them up" Jeff Davis would have taken the first buggy
      out of town. Maybe, maybe not.
      this morning.

      Delete
  16. A couple of observations on LI-FI: photon beam loading has
    been extensively used in fiber optics transport-
    "​As with many lightsources, the balance between energy consumption, light output, color temperature and lightsource life requires a careful understanding of the tasks which are to be performed. While Fiber Optic lighting is preferred for jobs such as wire bonding or soldering of fine-pitch components, pure white LED light is preferred for detailed inspection of circuit boards, welds, solder joints, flux residues and hairline stress cracks"
    Secondly, the advantages of higher data loading with LI-FI, I suspect, is limited in that photons travel in a tight beam, while the current radio/microwave of WI-FI travel is
    ubiquitous-everywhere, through walls and structures. It may be that LI-FI would prove useful in very high data applications over direct distances, then converted at user
    locals. CERN?

    ReplyDelete
  17. A personal jetpack for recreation or crossing busy streets
    sounds attractive. It may be a bit trickier that walking.
    Reminds me of that commercial for the elderly emergency
    communicator "help, I've fallen and can't get up" except the
    call would be "help, I'm stuck up in a microwave tower and can't get down!" Ya think?

    ReplyDelete
  18. I really do need to get up to speed. Li-Fi and personal jetpacks are just two of the things I didn't even know existed. The NY Times a couple weeks ago even had an article on flying cars. Air rage anyone? Jetpacks are good for military uses and Dubai even uses water-powered jetpacks to fight fires. Cat rescues in trees?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My guess is any treed cat that saw a human jet plane
      hovering a few feet away would exit the tree voluntarily.

      Delete
    2. Technology is proceeding apace. You wake up and it's like a different world. How soon before we teleport? Halfway thru your workshift they can't find you ("he went to the bathroom about a half hour ago").

      Delete
  19. If you're really really bored and have nothing else to do, too much time on your hands you can try and find your doppelganger.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My wife has a cousin, a professional new age healer:
      "..experienced in a number of energy healing modalities (Emotion Code, Pranic Healing, Angel Therapy & Reiki) and hold many certifications in addition to being ordained ministers. Our ability to connect with angels, guides, and our clients’ Higher Selves to bring through relevant insights and information for their lives can assist others in moving forward during these intense times."
      $100/hr..right up there with super-cheffing. Our
      side of the family tree is the de-bunker side, so
      I've never used the services....

      Delete
    2. Doppleganger, literally double goer. 19th Century
      German. Pretty interesting concept; movies of that title in 1969, 1993 and 2015. There is a listing of
      the thirty best movies about Doppelgangers for the aficionado for the interested. The lady that took my driver license photo was quite sure I didn't have one.

      Delete
    3. I understand new age is new age, not everyone's cup but don't debunkers want to believe in anything? Bigfoot no, ghosts no, mandelaisms no no, Loch Ness no...ever think of working for snopes part-time?

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    4. Guy told me he saw me in Tarrytown one day. I've been there on a few but not on that particular day. He was rather adamant so rather than start an argument I let it go. Imagine walking down the street one day and you walk into your doppelganger. "Hey how's it going?"

      Delete
    5. As I understand the alternate universe/dimension mathematics, there is a possibility of such, perhaps and infinite variety of such. The mystics
      assume these not only exist, but somehow cross each
      other somewhere someplace, leading to the unaccountable in peoples lives. The odds of meeting
      your doppleganger seem really slim to me. But assuming one did, would you go into a bar like identical twins, order the same drink and agree
      on everything?

      Delete
    6. Debunkers: not familiar with them as a group or club. Carl Sagon debunked a lot, and the Amazing Randi of mind powers that bent spoons
      turned professional debunker. IMO there are enough
      real life things to study without making up stuff and consider a lot of the odd new age mystical whatnot sort of a scam on the innocents (PT Barnham's suckers). Know a guy in the mountains
      that builds electric circuits into wooden boxes and sells them as medical devices that will cure anything; with dials the set to 'lower limbs', 'forhead' 'colon' and the like. He swears by them, sells a few, but never seen the m in the New England Journal of Medicine, ya know?

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    7. Pondering the personal jet pack..what sort of pole vault records might we see?

      Delete
    8. I've no problem with the idea of parallel realities but prefer to think of them as alternate timelines as in you live more than once. I am very against the idea of the multiverse however and scientists need to abandon this trend/fad. The idea that there are at least 100 versions of me is imo ABSURD. I wake up one morning and decide to wear blue socks but that reality bifurcates and branches off because the other possibilities ALL have to be realized in some other universe like boxers instead of briefs that to me should not be given serious thought.

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    9. Debunking - I don't consider myself a debunker. On many subjects you should begin with skepticism but that doesn't mean you should end with skepticism. In other words Loch Ness and Boggy Creek may be two totally different phenomenon.

      Delete
    10. While on the subject of jetpacks check out Flyboard Air on YouTube.

      Delete
  20. Seems to be the era of 'Taking Sides':
    ---Saying that Girl Scouts is “no longer a compatible partner in helping us form young women with the virtues and values of the Gospel,” the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas is severing ties with the organization and switching its support to a Christian-based scouting program.

    “I have asked the pastors of the Archdiocese to begin the process of transitioning away from the hosting of parish Girl Scout troops and toward the chartering of American Heritage Girls troops,” Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann said in a statement released Monday.---
    Seems to be a really big deal .
    So, what will be the effect on cookie types?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bishop Naumann was no doubt impressed by "Girls can proceed through various ranks. As a Tenderheart, members can earn a PRAY award by making a pizza with crust, cheese and sauce to learn about Holy Trinity"
      Holy pepperoni! Glad I left the Cub Scouts with only
      a wolf and bear badge. So, to answer my question above about cookie sales, I'm guessing Apostolic Fudge
      Rounds, Magdalen Muffin Treats and Benediction Brownies. (not debunking, they might be good)

      Delete
    2. Since when did the Girl Scouts become a bad influence?

      Delete
  21. I haven't run away, we went to OBX for the weekend. It was nice.

    Doppelgangers, in our family it's cousins that look so much alike. According to my mother I am a virtual twin of my cousin Linda and my sister looks exactly like my cousin Jennifer. Even brothers and sisters sometime mistake the cousin for their own sibling. It's very weird.

    I think conservatives (as well as some progressives) play this double standard game. We want smaller government but we're going to legislate who can marry whom and what happens to your uterus. Literally can you get any more invasive than that? And this whole lower taxes thing...that only seems to apply to the wealthy, and besides isn't it a mathematical truth that you need to raise revenue in some way and that taxes are a part of that? Even Reagan raised taxes (11 times). You can't play unless you pay. Even I who never even took trig can figure that out. The government has to be funded and the way that's done is by taxation. So this whole lower taxes mantra is basically just propaganda.

    I read an article today about how the head of MSNBC is trying to make his programming more centrist but to do that he has to ignore the fact that his left wing superstars (like Maddow) are hitting sky high ratings and that his right wing players (like Greta van Sustern) don't have nearly the ratings that even their competitors do. So the thing to watch is whether he's willing to sacrifice ratings for his ideological vision. You'd think that would be a no brainer but there you go.

    I hate reality television. These days I pretty much watch NFL Network with a little Velocity and Food Network thrown in.

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  22. BTW Stephen Hawking says we need to leave the Earth within the next 100 years. I don't know where to go though. It's bad enough when your company closes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hawking was born the year after me, diagnosed with
      MND the year I graduated college and given two years to live. Wouldn't underestimate the guy. Doubt he is using quantum mechanics to estimate either his prediction of humans wrecking their planet, or AI
      replacing them...but he has a point.

      Delete
    2. We note earlier
      predictions-
      Martin Luther 1600, Cotton Mather 1647, Jim Jones 1967, Pat Robinson 1982, Isaac Newton 2000, and the Hebrew Talmud 2234. Most of which turned out a bit
      pessimistic; have to wait a couple millennia on the
      Talmud. On the bright side, the inevitable thermodynamics of entropy reaching zero are way
      out there at 10 duotrigintillion years (about 1 google- or 10 with 103 zeros after it)

      Delete
    3. Geordie Rose, Stephen Hawking, Brian Greene et al need to give up the idea of a multiverse. Just because I decided not to wear Hanes today it was a potential choice and as such according to multiverse theory reality bifurcated, split off to another almost identical universe but in which I did go to work in my Hanes today. Through the power of my Hanes choice I created another universe, timestream or alt-reality and is it any wonder shrinks aren't down with this?

      Delete
  23. Geez Hillary is still bitter over the election isn't she? The only thing she didn't blame was a solar flare. New conservative op-ed contributor over at the NY Times and readers are upset he chose to qestion climate change.

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  24. The problem with questioning climate change is science. It isn't something like the Easter Bunny or Santa Claus that you have the option of choosing to believe in or not. Science says climate change is real. The icecaps are really melting. This is not someone's opinion, it's scientific fact. Why not put a flat earther in at the NYT op ed page?

    Speaking of apocalypses, the Vedas say there are 432,000 years left before Lord Kalki comes (on a white horse with a sword, wonder where the Bible got that from) to annihilate the earth and start the cycle over again.

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  25. Anecdotely we haven't had ice-skating here in any natural lakes and ponds since I was growing up but with climate change what's supposed to happen? Will Yonkers one day be under water? The rub is when you hear "warming" it might strike many as not being a bad thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. IMO, climate change deniers includes a range like anything else; people that go over the data, interpret it differently, people that don't notice any change over their lifetimes, people that don't want climate to change and the denyers who take joy
      in denying (the type that buys up all the incandescent
      light bulbs, despite the fact they burnout faster and use more energy, just to vicariously poke an eye at the establishment. Be aware that major industries have
      climate change departments, as does the military and state departments of most countries. The concern is
      the population demographics and leaving hot dry areas.
      BTW, nice of the GOP to stop BC aid to the starving
      countries; we can sent more $$ to the little kid skeletons with flies all over them. Thanks, religious
      deep thinkers.

      Delete
    2. Though I do not count myself among their ranks it's always been my pov that climate change denial should not be treated like a thought crime. Just go about your day.

      Delete
    3. The only recent thought crime was laughing at Jeff
      Sessions when he was anointed. Penalty is laughable .

      Delete
  26. For what it's worth the latest conspiracy is Earth suffered a major extinction level event in 2012. The 23 CERN scientists known as the Collective then moved us into a parallel Earth. They also kindly rearranged our human anatomy (how I don't know) and world geography maps are somehow now different. Dead celebrities (mostly B-listers) coming back to life, the works. Somehow we all get to keep our same jobs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Didn't help my triglyceride level one bit.

      Delete
    2. Tinnitus levels about the same. Same premature waking, same boss. SSDD.

      Delete
    3. 2012: Obama & Putin elected, cruise ship runs aground off Italy, Benghazi, Whitney Houston dies
      in bathtub. Typical year, hardly a major extinction level, except for spotted owls and eastern wolves.
      Was the Collective outed by the Illuminati?

      Delete
    4. The internet is having a kind of nervous breakdown at the moment because many people have the creepy feeling we are not living in the same reality as before so along comes this anonymous poster on 4chan claiming to be a CERN scientist and so the conspiracy theory was sprouted and the overgullible kind of dig it. Examples of some of the changes allegedly engineered by CERN: anatomical ones like the kidneys no longer being at the waist level but under the ribs, the stomach no longer being straight down from the esophagus but higher up too, a larger liver up higher as well to help us better deal with any leftover toxins from the nuclear winter from the previous Earth. Geographical changes like South America being way too far to the east and Cuba now entering the Gulf of Mexico on world maps. You're right 2012 was your typical year. There was no geopolitical event brewing to potentially extirpate the human race and no asteroids or comet was predicted to hit the Earth. Wasn't there the whole Mayan calendar end of world thing around this time? It's just the latest theory to help explain why you can't find Depends adult diapers in the supermarket anymore.

      Delete
    5. All those critical organs moving higher towards the lungs. Guess it leaves space for a megacolon*. Perhaps too many colonoscopies and the organs are trying to escape?
      *megacolon- A human colon is considered abnormally enlarged if it has a diameter greater than 12 cm] in the cecum (it is usually less than 9 cm), greater than 6.5 cmin the rectosigmoid region d greater than 8 cm for the ascending colon. The transverse colon is usually less than 6 cm in diameter.

      A megacolon can be either acute or chronic. It can also be classified according to cause.[4

      Delete
    6. It would seem to be some type of human evolution. You'd think doctors would write papers on it and the media would talk about it. A larger liver to detoxify, a quicker route to the stomach to stave off hunger perhaps, the ribcage serving as a sort of protective apparatus and still nothing to prevent tinnitus.

      Delete
    7. The heart now more in the center of the chest which seems logical. Saw a commercial last night showing this. Dunno if it was one of them lawyer commercials or a pill one as I was half in the bag. It must be hard being a doctor as you always need the most up-to-date information like cartographers and navigators.

      Delete
  27. Despite Colbert's homophobic remarks the best line was "you have more people marching against you than cancer."

    ReplyDelete
  28. Prince Phillip is retiring from royal public life at 96.
    What a wuss.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm too appalled over this House vote to have anything else. I especially liked that line about how only people who have lived 'good lives' deserve healthcare. Basically we have to hope for the Senate to restore some perspective. That's not the most encouraging thought I've had all day.

    ReplyDelete
  30. With every passing day I have the yearning to move to Europe. People don't overwork in many of those countries and health care ain't a problem. Health care so ain't a problem it's not even talked about the way it is over here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They take healthcare, long vacations, short workweeks
      and care in old age for granted. For that, they pay higher taxes (and limit the amount CEOs can make).
      But be careful where you move; Spain & Greece are in
      a lot of trouble, France just doesn't like Americans
      and England thinks we talk funny.

      Delete
    2. The best countries to live in all have enviable health care, high living standards, low drug prices and governments that care more about people than
      corporations. But they haven't cured tinnitus.

      Delete
    3. The noise that follows you wherever you go.

      Delete
    4. Still working on your case. Ever have tonsilitus or
      vestibular neuritus? Dizziness or balance episode?
      There are only so many things involved in the ear and the transposition of sound waves into auditory signals. Does the tinnitus increase or decrease when
      your BP goes up from exercise? How much aspirin do
      you typically take? Should I make out a work up form? :)

      Delete
    5. Exercise doesn't seem to affect it. My stomach doesn't like aspirin. I had a case of Bell's Palsy as a kid and of course Lyme later on. Never a ringing. Always a humming, droning, pulsing even machine-like noise. Some people hear music, dunno.

      Delete
    6. I always wake up in the morning with music running through my head. This morning it was a waltz; I thought it was either the Gold & Silver Waltz, or the Skater's Waltz. Neither, a bit of time on YouTube and I figured out it was the Blue Danube.
      Cross of Lehar and Walteufel and go with Strauss.

      Delete
    7. Bell's Palsy and Lyme could suggest Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: a manifestation of shingles (latent chicken pox) that affects the ear and can cause
      tinnitus. The onset symptoms are noticeable, but
      did you have any around the time your tinnitus began?

      Delete
    8. Had my annual physical this week. Nothing but a nodule on the thyroid gland, which needs a sonogram.
      NP asked about my intermittent sleep (wife snores)
      and enquired regarding the types of sleep like REM
      under those circumstances. She responded by asking if I had nightmares. Luckily I had had one the previous night: was walking down town and there was some sort of odd religion having a seminar with free dinner. The meal was great, but the seminar was
      odd (Scientology, Mormon, JW, Baptist rolled into one. When I tried to leave, everyone I have ever known tried to stop me, grabbing arms, legs feet.
      I finally ripped lose and fell right out of bed.
      She says, "I won't write that down. Any blood in the urine?"

      Delete
    9. Bell's Palsy I had as a wee lad never since. Tinnitus theorizing where are we at? If the tinnitus researchers suffered from it I daresay there'd be a cure for it by now. As you noted you'd think Big Pharma would be heavily involved.

      Delete
    10. A recurring dream is I have a car like in real life but I have to walk like a mile to find it. In real life I'll sometimes forget the exact spot I parked so you're walking around the lot with your bags hoping you don't look like an idiot.

      Delete
    11. I'm thinking tinnitus, particularly the type caused
      by degeneration of the micro hairs in the the spiral organ of Corti on the thin basilar membrane in the cochlea of the inner ear, might be a subject for stem cell implantation. In the interim there are
      Bosely, Rogaine, Nioxin Hair Growth Shampoo and the
      robotic assisted FUE. Recommend waiting for the stem
      cell thing...

      Delete
  31. Spent some time at LiMing's today spending money and listening to Asian languages. They sell all kinds of stuff; I bought ten pounds of basmati, silken tofu, powdered ginger, wonton wrappers, various types of ramen and some china.

    I'd love to move overseas. I promise not to be an obnoxious American; I will love to learn about your culture and never EVER try to claim that the American way is superior (cause it ain't). Pretty much anywhere would be fine with me, Latin America, Europe, not Russia, not North Korea. Everything else is negotiable. I would love to go to Iceland but I don't know how I would manage during half the year when there's only four hours of daylight.

    I'm encouraged that the Senate isn't gung ho to pass a bill.

    Lecture with a free dinner, that sounds an awful lot like the Hare Krishnas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well one of the biggest pop/indie groups in Iceland right now is Of Monsters and Men. Personally I like some of their music. I find their lyrics often cryptic and their music videos can be quite good.

      Delete
    2. Whenever I think of Iceland I also think of Reagan and Gorbachev.

      Delete
    3. Also the home of the singer Bjork . Not that familiar, but her Bj
      name is similar to my Norwegian surname. People say
      how do you pronounce that? And I answer, sort of like Bjork.

      Delete
  32. Was talking with brother in law back in WI. He is recovering from a serious Lyme infection. Too sick to work,
    he went to a specialist in Oshkosh. 32 pills a day and 12 months later, he is finally back to work. The area of the
    Lyme study was my tramping grounds from 1959-1978, canoeing,
    camping and fishing. In all that time, I only got one tick
    and that was the days before Lyme. Big problem...can we blame global warming?

    ReplyDelete
  33. Actually we can. This year is predicted to be one of the worst years ever for ticks because it didn't get cold enough during the winter. And worse than Lymes is Alpha gal which one of my coworkers had/has and it nearly killed her. You can live with it by going vegan, but the sensitivity is such that you really have to worry about cross contamination. Just another way climate change is impacting lives. Meanwhile we entertain deniers like they've got some right to ignore science when it comes to legislation.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Climate denial is not on a par with Holocaust denial say. Legislation - aye there's the rub. How much?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can also submit not only may climate change be caused by our industrial age but perhaps tinnitus as well. If we're gonna legislate let's roll it up into one big ball. I think machinery makes too much noise.

      Delete
    2. Quite likely. Modern noises are louder and more varied frequency than Cro Magnons could imagine.
      They thought chipping an arrowhead made a racket.

      Delete
  35. BB imo most mainstream docs treat the subject of chronic Lyme like a fringe topic and that's too bad. It's amazing how an insect the size of a dot can fell a man.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Certainly dismantling the EPA and defunding NASA's attempts to research climate change aren't exactly the way to go. It's like he deliberately picks people who are against the agency he wants them to head. Ben Carson is concerned that people in homeless shelters are too comfortable. Fox News is appalled that poor people (the ones who get Medicaid and food stamps) have amenities like microwaves and refrigerators. This country is ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I read about the Ben Carson thing. He's an authority on everything now. It's embarrassing being a conservative these days. Maybe move to Scandinavia and start over as a liberal?

    ReplyDelete
  38. We not that the vodka-soaked buddies of Trumpenstein are at
    work
    in France now . The French are dumb, but not as dumb as
    us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've often said this though. If you have nothing compromising in your emails why should it help sway an election (e.g. "can you get a dozen eggs today and pick up the dog at the vet?"). Hack away.

      Delete
    2. The Snowden/Assange Effect?

      Delete
    3. Apparently it's not too hard to hack these days. Maybe even a bright 12-year old can do it.

      Delete
  39. By the way, I was pronounced officially 'in remission' from bipolar disorder. I never thought I'd see such a day as I always feel one bad night's sleep away from mania. But now I get to get on with the rest of my life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for you. There's still alot of judgementalism towards those with mental issues like they just want to annoy people. Problem is we're all tied to our brains.

      Delete
  40. Later this month President Trump will meet the Pope. Not sure about the rumors that it will be at Mara Lago, or that
    Donald is insisting on beatification for Steve Bannon....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trump meeting the Pope. That creepy alt-reality feeling is setting in again.

      Delete
    2. Maybe they'll discuss biocentrism.

      Delete
    3. ..or work out a deal for a TrumpHotel in the Vatican?

      Delete
  41. Saw yesterday on YT author Bill Wiese talking to Pat Robertson on CBN about his 23 Minutes in Hell. He was articulate and gave a graphic account. What are your debunking thoughts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robinson doesn't lie. He is just mistaken most of the time. If he is referring to a living situation, I
      tend to give the nod to those who were in Auschwitz.
      Did Pat bring back film?

      Delete
    2. Is Wiese a member of the Been There Club ?

      Delete
    3. Wiese didn't die. He said he went to Hell at 3AM and after 23 minutes there he found himself in the living room screaming. I've had really bad nightmares too.

      Delete
    4. Nevertheless he does put together a good compelling story enough to make the Times bestseller lists for a few weeks straight. He says in Hell they're nice enough to give you a body only you can never die.

      Delete
    5. O'Reilly's alt-history books are best sellers too.
      Until the hard data, Hell is what each of us imagine. For me, and eternal Trump administration.
      Unless my karma balance sheet is favorable..then the
      Halls of Valhalla. Even the finest food and drink
      served by Valkyries forever rings a bit hollow though.

      Delete
    6. Is Paul Ryan a planted demon?

      Delete
    7. He has that look doesn't he?

      Delete
    8. Been going over my karma balance sheet; shot and killed an innocent robin with a BB gun when I was
      eleven, backed up in a parking lot and ran over a
      drunken loggers foot and left, when 9 years old
      shook Snotty Eddy out of a sapling and his finger broke, let pretty Patty copy my history test in HS,
      got a traffic ticket for looking backwards at a
      Rock Island train crossing a bridge as I went through a speed trap....damn, I'm damned!

      Delete
    9. I think with the hellish NDE's too many people were having favorable experiences in the tunnel of light so this counteracts that. If you've cheated on your spouse a hundred times or crushed your business rivals why should you board the Candyland train? Didn't know Pat Robertson was into seers. I thought that was a Catholic thing.

      Delete
    10. You know karma the way Saty describes it is more unforgiving than God. It's simple mechanics - you did indeed do those things so now you might be cursed with an irritable bowel on a hot summer's day and ruin your car seat in your new car 'cause there's orange cones up ahead and you wanna curse at the flagman.

      Delete
    11. "What does it profit, my brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can faith save him? 15 If a brother or sister is naked and destitute of daily food, 16 and one of you says to them, “Depart in peace, be warmed and filled,” but you do not give them the things which are needed for the body, what does it profit? 17 Thus also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead." James 12:12-17 NKJV (thus spake Jesus'
      brother)

      Delete
  42. Karma's a law, plain and simple. There's no forgiveness about it because it operates independently. You rack up either good or bad karma...both of them keep you tied up in the material world, so in the end they're both bad. You're right, it's mechanics.

    ReplyDelete
  43. The Bill Wiese vision seems wrong from a Catholic perspective. The Ven. Mary of Agreda in "The Mystical City of God" says God's mercy extends even into the depths of Hell and that the demons are limited in what they can do to the damned (e.g. Wiese's 12' reptile man maybe raping you). Sure there's practical value in religion's fear factor but sometimes there's a certain relishing by the likes of the Pat Robertsons.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. St. Augustine invented 'original sin'. We are all lost under that concept. Why bother?

      Delete
    2. "..there's a certain relishing by" S. Baptists and
      other damnation specialists. Some can be controlled by fear alone.

      Delete
    3. Fear seems an inherent element of many religions as would be expected. IMO it's a positive thing if it is measured. If fear of damnation stops a businessman from crushing his rival there's a benefit in that. Many people by and large don't do the right thing so religion pushes a fear of hell as a kind of braking action on bad human behavior. Pope Francis recently severely warned the Sicilian Mafia they're on the road to Hell and as a churchman you'd expect him to do this as part of his job. It's the hucksters like Wiese who get in the way.

      Delete
    4. Some liberals too have invented original sin. All modern whites are tainted with the sins of slaveholding whites of yore thus the reparations movement but that's an extreme example.

      Delete
    5. It was invented by the Hebrews-
      "who keeps loving kindness for thousands, who forgives iniquity, transgression and sin; yet He will by no means leave the guilty unpunished, visiting the iniquity of fathers on the children and on the grandchildren to the third and fourth generations." -Exodus 34:7 IMO, the liberal argument blames not the sins of the fathers, but
      the ensuing Jim Crow Laws and KKK hangings. IMO,
      conservatives would agree?

      Delete
    6. How many liberals I've heard over the years say all whites have some latent unacknowledged racism in them. That's their conception of political original sin.

      Delete
  44. There seems to be no recourse from karma. We used to joke at work we have a little more bad karma to pay off. Maybe an aide to Genghis Khan in a past life.

    ReplyDelete
  45. France rejects quasi-Nazi, crypto-fascist candidate. Ecrasez l'infame, Viva l'raison, viva la France and stick
    it Breitbart.

    ReplyDelete
  46. French politics. I remember when Nicholas Sarkozy was the thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karma: there seems no concrete listing of good and bad karma. The Hindu, for example consider the killing of a nuisance insect bad karma, but the inhumane caste system is fine. The Catholics at least have venal and mortal sins and the cops have their
      misdemeanor and felony. IMO, a point system is needed
      in the karma dept. Cursing the hammer you hit your thumb with -1050 points, jaywalking -900 points, rescuing a kitten + 650, lusting in your heart -1400
      (unless it is Sandra Bullock 0) lying in the confessional -4800, giving to Drs Without Borders
      + 1700 etc. Am I out of line? Help me out here.

      Delete
    2. Precisely: like the Scales of Justice, each plus and each minus occurrence needs a value. Like that
      cartoon, where a guy is checking into heaven and it
      is run by Polar Bears. From a practical common sense POV, child molesting, running a red light,
      shooting the neighbor, robbing a bank, beating a dog, picketing a WallMart, perjury in court, skipping a loan, committing suicide, spraying agent orange, running a pimp operation, car bombing and
      bad personal hygiene are all negative karma. But
      are not some more negative than others?

      Delete
  47. Yes, some are more negative than others. The person who eats the cow gets bad karma but not as much as the person who killed the cow. But again, in the end, it's all bad.

    We don't believe in original sin per se. There's plenty enough of sin once you take a body. There are three kinds of karma; that which you haven't gotten yet, that which is waiting to be paid off and that which has been paid off. Again, despite momentary rewards, all of them are ultimately bad.

    In the 400s-500s in my history of the Church. Very interesting talk about monasticism, celebrating Christmas and the differences between the Greek and Latin churches (and how those differences rose up). A lot of the things I was taught to believe were things just hammered out at a conference, with no Biblical authority.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Too much knowledge of church history has a peculiar effect.

      Delete
    2. I can quote the Bible better than most Baptists. That's quite a feat for a Catholic turned Krishna.

      Delete
    3. It's interesting how people have such extremely different cosmologies. You have your evangelicals and your trad-Catholics and their extremely graphic soul-churning depictions of Hell then you got your calm cool discussion of karma. Watched Bill Wiese on Sid Roth's "It's Supernatural." The caption at the bottom said "he was given a guided tour of Hell" like it was an objective fact like the sky is blue and there's soil on the ground and he was given a guided tour of Hell. I kinda like the karma discussions better.

      Delete
    4. There are those who seem to relish the horrors of hell; sit rapt through fire and brimstone sermons, discuss it over coffee after service and suffer
      terrifying nightmares. All very edifying. I tracked down the owner of a gym collection agency
      that billed my wife a monthly charge for two years
      after the gym had gone out of business. Kind of surprised, his 'testimony' as a Pentacostal was on the net..almost a split personality. The state police advised I just quit paying. Presumably he
      is still screwing customers and giving testimony.
      When my daughter was in first grade she brought home another little girl, who had her in tears..the
      other girl being an expert on the Devil, his works
      and all the places in the neighborhood where he lurked. All Dads hate to see their little girl cry,
      so I lectured the little devil-sotted kid until she
      left crying. Never came back. Didn't help that she looked like Honey Boo Boo. Humans are so interesting. As for Weise, he knows that fraud is
      a big seller...always has been.

      Delete
    5. For me personally I always have this vision of Hell as being a wasteland full of desolation like a burnt-out city. The Trump Administration is a good second choice.

      Delete
  48. Was in the clinic yesterday, sitting and waiting for my appointment. Picked up one of the medical mags and first
    article I saw was "promising tinnitus treatment". Already
    approved in Europe (where the poor suckers get free healthcare, drugs a are cheap and most new methods pop up)
    the Belgians did a clinic study using vagus nerve stimulation. This is already an epilepsy treatment, but
    a variation was tried with a group of tinnitus patients,
    with a cure of around 50%. You are probably all up to date
    on the procedure, but if not, it is soon coming to
    your area .

    ReplyDelete
  49. Fire and brimstone was very popular back in the day. When the lecture 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God' (Jonathan Edwards?) was delivered people were actually screaming, crying and fainting. The predestination crowd is particularly hardcore. Either you is or you ain't and there's nothing you can do about it. I don't know how popular this view is anymore.

    I've been seriously trying to keep away from the news. Today's my Guru's birthday and in honor I made a feast: stuffed grape leaves, vegan sushi, cream cheese wontons, salad with vegan ranch dressing, baked brie, Italian macaroni and cheese and cheesecake. I'm just now realizing how international this menu is. My sushi skills are abysmal. It's almost sinful how wasteful sushi is of ingredients, you prep just a little and you still have leftovers. Grape leaves I am much better at, I made about 50.

    Wouldn't they have to surgically implant the magnet for a VNS? Seems extreme for tinnitus and where would it be implanted? I'm just saying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VNS is used for a variety of conditions and yes, typically the implant is just beneath the left clavical. For the audio area it is sometimes up just beneath the jaw. Now they are working on
      "Wearable" devices are being tested and developed that involve transcutaneous stimulation and do not require surgery. Electrical impulses are targeted at the aurical (ear), at points where branches of the vagus nerve have cutaneous representation. Specifically the concha has been target for t-VNS.
      Tinnitus can be quite debilitating for some sufferers,
      so there is a market. No idea of the cost, though.
      Religion-wise, I watched a bit of some woman evangelist bashing abortion, the logic being if we
      kill fetuses, we can never get rid of violent killing in society. Sort of curious, I checked her bio, etc.
      She is in therapy because her husband keeps cheating on her. Humans are interesting.

      Delete
    2. I wouldn't expect a debunker to believe in the Devil. A debunker might even try to debunk his own existence. I mean the odds of me even existing...Abortion is supposed to be very serious karma-wise but don't know how many negative points. The tinnitus treatment sounds interesting but complicated and probably pricey. I think as a rule insurance pauses when it comes to experimental treatments. Maybe if I tweet Trump.

      Delete
    3. Debunk-wise, IMO the Devil represents evil in the world; since God can't be responsible, gotta blame
      something or someone. It's complicated.

      Delete
    4. People tend to blame the Devil for everything. Big family rift over the holidays they blame the Devil. Devil: "I wasn't even over there. I was on the Bronx River Parkway fixing a flat."

      Delete
    5. Heard the Devil Wears Prada; that he is horny goes without saying.

      Delete
  50. Meanwhile theoretical whiz kid physicists have discovered
    the wimp.
    "The most widely accepted hypothesis on the form for dark matter is that it is composed of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that interact only through gravity and the weak force." Rumor is that they are working on Nerd:
    Neutrino Excitation-induced Retroactive Degeneration. Who can tell black matter from black magic anymore?

    ReplyDelete
  51. I have an introductory book on physics that uses superheroes' powers to explain physics. 32 feet per second per second is as far as I was able to get without a calculator. Isn't it true that a lot of these brilliant minds do get into mysticism, black magic for lack of a better term? It seems that when the mind goes off into these intrastellar inquiries (or subatomic inquiries too I guess) that they sort of get drawn into the mystic. Or am I just dreaming that up?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quantum mechanics posits the possibility of multiple
      universes and dimensions (at least the equations permit such). I was pondering the popular versions of
      'alternate' universes, where we are somehow affected or related. But it would seem remarkable if these potential other places had an earth atmosphere, living
      creatures or livable temperatures. It is equally, if remotely possible that one or two might be Weise's Hell.

      Delete
    2. Along those lines I was rereading parts of a Bermuda Triangle ebook last night. Something about if the frequency of subatomic particles is changed you can have your parallel dimension maybe walk through a wall. The stuff starts to give you a migraine.

      Delete
    3. Wiese leaves out any relevant details. You can have sardines with cream sauce in the evening then before retiring have a couple of power shots of Jose Cuervo and then dream about Hitler. Just sayin'

      Delete
  52. Physics can be strange. My friend and I went to a side trail in Hastings yesterday that runs parallel to the Metro North tracks with wonderful views of the Palisades and Hudson. A train heading north towards the Hastings train station slowed down and stopped then went backwards. "Do trains go in reverse?" I said and we figured they might. Then the strange thing. All of a sudden the train on the same tracks was heading north at a fast but normal pace. No way in a matter of seconds could that train pick up that speed from a standstill. I called it a reverse mandela;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. According to an engineer report-
      "If you know how to drive a car with manual transmission, you can think of it like this: the metro train is in second gear all the time while a normal train is in fourth gear all the time. On top of that the normal train also has less horse power."
      --we consider that these reach speed much quicker than the high tonnage, low horsepower freights.

      Delete
    2. A fair enough engineering explanation but I still found the movement of the train somewhat puzzling like maybe he thought he dropped his smartphone on the tracks.

      Delete
  53. James Comey replacement?
    The little Trump boy? Jeff Session's daughter? The traffic
    cam coordinator from Yonkers? Ivanka's cousin? Steve Bannon's ex wife? The Mara Lago lawn guy? 2 requirements,
    apparently: must think like Trump and must be without a clue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wasn't Comey one of Hillary's Top 10 Reasons Why I Lost the Race?

      Delete
    2. IMO, yes: his announcement in the last week of the campaign was the straw that broke the Russian hacking releases. Trump is still mad that he didn't "lock her up". Seven congressional investigations over the previous five years found
      little, but tarnished her. But Comey was non partisan: he was going after the Trump crew in the same manner. Must have been getting close. Dunno,
      looks to me like Trump is sort of self-destructing:
      VP said firing the guy investigating him showed
      "firmness and resolve", Kellyanne said it was all
      Hillary's fault and they are doing the will of the American People. When you have all three branches of government you can fire anyone, lock up anyone
      and feather the nests of your friends and sycophants. As I recall, Germany in the 1930s.
      Maybe put up a concentration camp in Jersey?

      Delete
    3. The replacement should be interesting. Steve Bannon?

      Delete
  54. I've been hold off on ordering a new jet pack . A little pricey, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Basically a toy for the rich like the Rinspeed Etos. Again an issue of air rage comes up.

      Delete
    2. Yes I'm gonna hold off too.

      Delete
  55. If your Conspiracy Theory app isn't working, I ran across
    a few, perhaps worthy of your investigation:
    Denver Airport is the home of all evil
    Saddam Hussein had a Stargate
    'Saved by the Bell' was a vehicle for the Illuminati
    The Beatles never existed
    Calculations proved today is four days at once
    The earth is hollow, with entries at both poles
    Michael Jackson was killed by the Iranian government
    ...where is Comey when you need him?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Beatles never existed. Is that a multiverse one like in another place and time Hitler won WW2?

      Delete
  56. Who would fire James Comey but keep Kellyanne Conway? Who?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least the circus and the clowns keep the news cycle humming. I laughed out loud when the Donald
      called Comey a 'showboater'. Trump's base of support remains loyal, though.

      Delete
  57. Trump appoints Kansas Attorney General known for stamping out voter fraud to his new Commission to investigate voter
    fraud. The guy is a real ferret: in 6 years he has tracked down and convicted 9 voters..6 of them old people that didn't know what they were doing. To hell with the news,
    I'm going to watch Barney Miller reruns.

    ReplyDelete
  58. So what's up with the Denver Airport?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The airport at Denver, according to the
      CT people, includes:
      A statue of the horse of the Apocalypse
      The Masonic capstone
      Numerous gargoyles
      Swastika shaped runways
      A sinister mural of the Holocaust
      ...all fraught with some sort of sinister meaning.
      IMO, aside from the artwork, the airport construction
      next to the remains of the Rocky Mt. Arsenal, where
      tons of chemical and biological weaponry was stored;
      and the fact there is no statue of the Ten Commandments would concern the CT people if they actually thought about it.

      Delete
  59. Social cons are always complaining about the debauched nature of modern society. I can't remember the last time I was invited to an orgy though. How 'bout you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My orgy days are so far back in the mists of time, I
      don't recall, but think that frat parties and the all night half priced liquor in the Army officer club might have come close. Ever noticed that social con
      politicians are always getting caught with hookers?

      Delete
  60. Some stuff is beginning to look more normal than the Trump presidency.

    ReplyDelete
  61. I read that Pence was talking to a group of Christians and was going on and on about how they're so persecuted. In north Africa maybe; in the US they're 77 percent of the population and now has a president who wants to let churches do political activities. Tell me again who's persecuted?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many churches have already become too political. How many times have Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson spoken at black churches and getting all political about it?

      Delete
    2. Everything is political these days, but the Evangelicals have been far an away the most powerful
      in electing "qualified' candidates.

      Delete
    3. Does Bill Wiese have a say?

      Delete
    4. I think Bill is a tinnitus carrier.

      Delete
    5. Dunno, from what I've seen on the news black churches can be very political and always in a Democrat/left-wing way but it doesn't become much of an issue just Al Sharpton spoke at the Baptist church.

      Delete
    6. Trump spoke at Liberty University today. Jerry Falwell was a social conservative, as is that institution. Some universities are religious, and their
      politics follow. Yet the Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina is an agnostic. Yet the US Council of Bishops practice the politics of the mitre and well
      paid TV evangelists damn liberals as tools of satan
      routinely. Bush II tried to remove tax exemption from a CA Episcopal church whose pastor decried the
      invastion of Iraq. IMO, tax exemptions for churches
      is OK, exemptions for political organizations should be extremely high and Trump, like Reagan,
      should try to attend a service at least once in awhile.

      Delete
    7. I don't decry you. It's an okay point.

      Delete
  62. I posted elsewhere-
    "Jefferson put great faith in the common voter. So it is somewhat bizarre the the BBC reported:
    “Also among the slightly odd findings of the poll, 18% of respondents who felt that Mr Trump was not qualified to be president nonetheless voted for him, as did 20% of those who felt he did not have the necessary temperament.” The president has a strange base…we live in interesting times"
    To wit: the multiverses/dimensions may be awry-there is no
    logical explanation otherwise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stumbled across the subject of DMT on the net. Illegal and probably the most powerful psychedelic but also naturally occurring in the body and widely found in the plant and animal kingdom. Maybe it's out of whack somehow and Trump looks like a savior. Dunno.

      Delete
    2. I guess if you want to see space aliens, that is the stuff to snort. But, you would have to be at some S. American Indian celebration. No wonder they
      like shrunken heads.

      Delete
    3. I googled it last night and don't know why you would take the stuff. I guess everyday life is too boring for some. Dunno.

      Delete
  63. I read an article about a constitutional scholar (I think) calling for impeachment proceedings. Is it too soon to hope?

    ReplyDelete
  64. With the firing of Comey I definitely think there's grounds. Conservatives are following their leader like a cult.

    ReplyDelete